Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/27/2020 in all areas

  1. We’re all here, and we’re out of the starting gate. Trevecca’s main hall filled once again this morning with three score eager guitarists. With so many new faces around me, introductions spun out one after another. Paulette said there was no one this year from outside the U.S. Steve welcomed everyone, settled us down and called for questions. From the other side of the room I heard: “Steve, is your online moderator Diane here?” With that, any chance of staying under the radar was shot. Our first task was to get warmed up with stretches, then came Steve’s workout with basic chords. Flatpicker David Grier’s masterclass was indeed a class, as he not only entertained us but also patiently explained his techniques and how he learns them. I must paraphrase, but David urged us to play with people who are better musicians, and ask them how they do what they do. Persevere. It can be something simple, but play in time. How reassuring to hear a virtuoso admit, “the simplest things will befuddle me”. With no lunch service on campus, we had to scatter and scrounge. Greg Otto and I followed the GPS-recommended, presumably scenic, route to M. L. Roses — mobbed as usual — but found a table and managed to return without crossing county lines. I hurried back inside, scooped up my gear, and scurried past a crowded room where Collin Hill started up his finger style workshop. Seeking something new this year, I parked in the back of Kim McClean’s session on songwriting. Elsewhere, Greg Voros taught setup and maintenance, and Paulette covered introductory music theory. Steve had about half of us for his blues basics workshop while the jazzers found their sevenths on the second floor with Andy Reiss. We broke into six groups of about ten each for beginner, bluegrass, jazz, and blues jams. My blues group was led by our friend Dino Pastin and his son Vince. We were all skill levels, and I could see we were all having a ball. Bluegrass pro Jim Hurst closed out the day with sincere advice to make your music your own and play from your heart. As I finished a solo dinner, I realized I was about to fall asleep right in my food. Outside I saw road work, and I remembered Kim’s challenge to write a song for tomorrow. Write a song? I could barely chew. But I had an idea. Two words, a title perhaps. I drove back to Trevecca, parked in the shade, sat in the AC and wrote a verse on my iPad. Hardly thinking, I took out my phone and sang it to a melody that came from — wherever they come from. Then a chorus. Recorded that, too. Tweaked the title. Geez, I thought, this is already half a song. Suddenly I was awake. We closed out the night with an acoustic concert featuring master fingerstylists Collin, Parker Hastings, and Joe Robinson. What a first day. Maybe by lunch tomorrow I’ll have a song for Kim.
    13 points
  2. I stepped out of my car into a warm, sunny, muggy afternoon in Nashville. On the seat, I saw a glint of blue and green — two picks I thought were already lost. A good omen. With me behind the music building at Trevecca sat only a single blue SUV, but I recognized it as the one that matters. We were back. Paulette greeted me with a big smile and a warm hug. She had already set up the store, organized the goodie bags, and arranged the chairs. The stage was assembled, and Timothy arrived with the ice. Nothing left for me to do. I treaded softly up the steps toward a familiar figure who was tweaking a video message board. “Just make sure I look good,” I said with a smile. Another big hug, from Steve. I left him to his preparations and returned to the rehearsal hall. Others were arriving. Paulette said we were up to 61 this time, along with some spouses. Soon we had about half that number for the meet and greet. We had serious catching up to do over our ice cream. The room filled with animated, excited chatter as the first timers met the old hands — and I suppose that now I fall into the latter group. It’s particularly nice to meet in person for the first time someone you’ve only known through the discussion board. And there are many first timers. Attendance this year is a bit off. There were 90 plus here in 2019. I suspect that the pandemic took its toll on budgets, priorities, and even health. But here, for a few days, anticipation, fellowship, and music will be in the air. We’re already thinking of our guitar friends who just can’t be with us. Wherever you are, tune up and play along with us in spirit. We are back.
    12 points
  3. Around the first turn we go. Steve’s workout exercised the mechanics of picking and strumming. If the morning coffee had yet to kick in, the pot of Bart Walker’s steaming hot blues got us in gear. SRV at ten a.m.? Only at this affair. I strolled with Greg, first timer Liz, and our fellow migrating bluesbirds to the Subway at the front entrance. It felt good to walk around in the warmth — briefly. Liz and I camped at a table in the music building’s loft and enjoyed some leisurely quiet time getting acquainted over our sandwiches. Back in songwriting class, Kim critiqued some raw and finished compositions that had been sent to her overnight. She pitched us an pop exercise straight out of a prose writer’s workshop — two minutes to write seven song titles — 3, 2, 1, go! I managed three duds, a maybe, and a keeper that got her attention. Meanwhile, Steve and Paulette continued teaching theory and Collin had the fingerpickers a-boom-chucking away. Andy Reiss set the jazzers’ axes to “Phrase”, and Jim Hurst mowed down the bluegrass tricks. Kim kept my class running overtime, and I was on a roll, so I lingered until she had to leave. It meant skipping Steve’s worship music class, but my compensation was a blissful, quiet respite in the lounge before returning to Dino’s blues jam. We all piled back into the main room to wrap up with Parker Hasting’s thumb picking masterclass. He’s not quite twenty one years old and already teaches with more clarity and poise than a lot of tenured professors I’ve known. Jim Hurst and his trio entertained us at our evening concert with a sweet mix of toe tappers, ballads, and endearing stories. And his handshake? Warm as the Tennessee sunshine.
    12 points
  4. "Tears in Heaven" is on Eric Clapton's soundtrack album "Rush" for the 1991 film of the same name. This is my attempt to cover this all-time classic in a solo fingerstyle arrangement. Wim. https://soundcloud.com/wim-van-damme-401299565/tears-in-heaven-ec
    12 points
  5. Down the backstretch hard, and turning for home. Does Pat Lindgren ever sleep? She had a jam going at 8:30 am when I walked in the door. Eventually they had to stop to give Steve a chance to run his show. We started with a lesson from Steve and Dino on solo improvising. Joe Robinson returned for a masterclass on fingerpicking, for which I afterwards heard only praise for his skill as a teacher. Check out JoeRobinson.com to see for yourself. My noon expedition with Greg in search of the Hattie B’s on 8th street, only 12 minutes away, devolved into a 45 minute loop of central city, two crossings of the Cumberland, an encounter with a funeral procession, and a near collision with an idiot who cut in front of us. He promised to have the GPS app humanely euthanized. Back to theory land with Steve for me. He responds to the phrase “tritone substitution” the way most most people respond to “free dessert”. Enough said. Another new guest artist this year was Scott Bernard, side man to Kenny Loggins. Scott walked us through his pedalboard as he explained how he gets the tone he wants. The gearhounds among us couldn’t get enough. We wrapped with singers Debi Shelby and Peter Penrose demonstrating how guitarists can be proper accompanists. They closed with soaring harmony on a hymn that brought a tear to my eye and the whole gang to their feet. After a short break at my hotel to panic about tomorrow’s song and where to find dinner tonight, I scooped up Liz at Trevecca and executed Operation Tell Greg Where to Go. He was already waiting at the LongHorn when Liz and I pulled up. We toasted our teacher and cheerfully took the rap for each other for Liz’s benefit. Then off to Franklin. On Main Street I had to wait for some tourists to cross in front of me. They looked a lot like David, Keith, and Mark. We parked and strolled towards towards the Franklin Theatre as Greg rolled by, shouting out his window: “Diane! Where did you park?” Operation TGWTG still nominal. The Franklin Theatre is a little gem within a diamond of a town. Poor Liz, sitting to my right: I had not been sitting next to the gentleman on my left for more than five minutes before we were into George Gruhn’s albino snake, Carter guitars, and David Grier. Tonight a full house welcomed the return of Larry Carlton to the stage after a year’s absence for the shutdown. Drums, sax, trombone, keys, bass, and everything of Steely Dan except Donald and Walter. They bid us goodnight; we clapped for an encore. I turned to Liz and shouted, “Well, he has to come back for ‘Peg’”. He did. Liz and I looked at each other and grinned.
    11 points
  6. This tune was composed for the broadway musical, Carnival in Flanders, by Johnny Burke and Jimmy Van Heusen. The play opened in 1953 and ran for just six days. What is best remembered about the production is this tune from the second act. I became aware of 'Rainy Day' listening to a recording by Wes Montgomery on his Bumpin' LP. This chord melody arrangement was inspired by the first chorus of Kenny Burrell's cover on his LP, Soul Call. I recorded it for an audition for the Jazz Port Townsend Workshop in 2019. Thanks for listening!
    11 points
  7. When I watch Tommy E. play this, I always get a smile on my face. So I hope I can pass the good vibes this song gives me on to all of my guitar friends here. Wim.
    10 points
  8. Epilog I’m back home after my usual extra week of stops in Tennessee, North Carolina, and Virginia. Lately it’s the only significant traveling I do. I see friends and family, decompress, and ease myself back into the real world. Ironically, the two weeks carve a hole in my practice and playing, but it’s a healthy break. I don’t feel guilty, only blessed that I have the chance. A theme of several of my conversations with my guitar pals was: enjoy this to the fullest — in time this, too, will pass. I’ve come to know many of our gang like family. I am grateful for your kind words and constant encouragement. I’m just trying to pay it forward where I can. This gathering felt especially intimate after skipping a year. It was my sixth, and counting two retreats, my eighth event with Steve. There’s nowhere else I could stumble through a song in front of sixty people with every face looking my way. That’s a memory to cling to — when it all goes crazy and the thrill is gone.
    9 points
  9. I can't add much to what Diane and Greg have posted above. It was a great week of seeing old friends and making new ones. We were able see, hear and rub elbows with some of the finest talent in Nashville. Thanks to Gruhn's, Artisan, North American Guitar, Carter Vintage, and the new Gibson Garage, we saw and played more guitars than we would in a lifetime back home. Looking forward to next year. Below is a link to all the photos I took last week - starting from packing the car to the closing session. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/svwd4aeu4lpob35/AAACnryfaU3BwSUFb2hkIEcna?dl=0
    9 points
  10. I'm slipping in just under the wire with my acoustic cover of "Classical Gas." If I could point to one song that inspired me to play guitar, this would be it. I remember seeing someone (most likely Mason Williams) play it on TV when I was nine or ten years old and I've loved it ever since. The original version, released in 1968, included an orchestra. This is a cover of the guitar solo released on the 1970 album Handmade. Thanks for listening.
    9 points
  11. This CCR song was originally released in 1969. I heard this slowed down acoustic arrangement (by Lyle Workman & The Forest Rangers) in an episode of the TV series Sons Of Anarchy. It took me quite a bit of work to transcribe it. The fingerstyle accompaniment is just 3 chords G, F and C, but they are played in many different ways. I recorded it in 2 tracks, because in the end I liked this more than arranging it into a solo fingerstyle piece. Thanks for giving it a listen. Wim.
    9 points
  12. As some of you may have seen, last week I asked for advice about Martin guitars. And, predictably, I received some great advice from you. But! I didn't follow your advice😉😆 Not exactly anyway. I had largely decided on the Martin 000-28EC, the Clapton signature model. I had played one at my favorite local store, heard great things about them, reviews, etc. but held off. And now there are none in stock locally; I would have to order online. After getting your advice I went back in my local store, which is Lidgett's in Council Bluffs, IA. I asked him, "I know that you don't have a Martin Clapton signature in stock. But what do you have that I would like?" He replied, "I really think you need to try this one that I just got in. It's a Martin M-36. It's similar in size to a dreadnaught, but not as thick. A lot of people find it comfortable and it sounds almost as full as a dreadnaught" You know how we often use the expression about guitar shopping, "Find the guitar that speaks to you"? Or something similar. That is exactly what happened! It is really comfortable. It plays and sounds great. And I came home with it today. And.......it was significantly less money than the EC! Sorry about the horrible portable camera photo but I wanted to snap this to show you and get back to playing it!!
    8 points
  13. Thanks Diane for articulating so well , good memories for me and and other attendees, as well as for the whole of The Guitar Gathering community. It is such a special time for those that can find opportunity to visit Nashville and share treasured moments with so many like-minded and wonderful enthusiasts of all things of guitar learning. Every year I expand my friendships with more and more faces and names to look forward to seeing again in 12 months. It is a joyous time for me as I hope it is for others who attend as well. I thank Steve, Paulette, their family and Trevecca University for giving so much of themselves to make this happen . As I do every time I go to the annual event, I encourage anyone who wishes to spend an uplifting , entertaining and inspirational musical experience and fellowship to consider attending the GG conference. It is one of life’s highlights for me. Greg
    8 points
  14. On to the finish line. It’s Showcase Day, which means I wear my heart necklace with the music note on it. Steve’s workout was a short pentatonic lick in various keys. To my dismay, I noticed that even after some warming up, my fingers were not cooperating. Wake up, little Susies, I muttered, we gotta get to work in a few minutes. We scattered the chairs and music stands and clambered around the stage for Chuck Thompson to take the group photo. A dozen exposures and twice that number of wisecracks later, it was snack time. Now, for any teacher’s favorite moment: seeing his students go for it. The Student Showcase hour featured a dozen first timers and old hands alike. One could sense everyone in the room silently rooting for their friends on stage. I like to watch Steve watching us. He simply glows with pride. When I leaned into the microphone for my first line, it sounded like someone else singing, someone better than me. My fingers were still sleep deprived, but as I looked out on the faces before me, including Steve’s, that didn’t matter. Applause and cheers for all. The heartfelt hugs. Once more, the clang of chairs stacking, the snaps of cases closing, the calls for just one more picture. The cars and trucks coming to life, ferrying away the guitars and the memories. Later, Greg, Pat, and I rendezvoused back in the parking lot — my usual tactic — for a night at the Opry. We scored center seats near the front for Ricky Skaggs, Sara Evans, Vince Gill and others on Bill Anderson’s 60th anniversary with the Opry. The house was packed and appreciative for the occasion. Finally, even we three die hards had to part. One last check to ensure the lights were off, and no stray picks were left on the sidewalk. Then our triad arpeggiated into the Nashville night.
    8 points
  15. I was a teenager in the Eighties, when Cyndi Lauper scored a hit with this pop song which is pure nostalgia to me. It was originally played on keyboards. Eva Cassidy recorded a great guitar version. This is my short rendition. Chords and melody were played fingerstyle and recorded on separate tracks. Wim.
    8 points
  16. Hello everyone, I am stepping down from running this series of Challenges but I have excellent news for you ....... @Wim VD1 has kindly agreed to take over. I would like to thank Wim very much for agreeing to do this, I did not want to just drop this as I believe that recording your work and sharing it is important for the development of musicians and now it is even more so with the global Covid problem. I will bow out and leave Wim to pick this months winner etc. A big thank you to all who have posted recordings in the past and I hope you will continue to do so and that others will join in too. Thank you also to those of you who have taken the time to post words of encouragement for us or have hit the like button. Without you people would most likely stop posting their recordings and these Challenges would disappear. You have not heard the last from me yet, I will still hang around this forum and if you are really unlucky I may post a song or two. 🤓
    8 points
  17. I alluded to it in my post in the thread about Nashville guitar stores. Surprisingly, as excited as we were about it, I didn't make a bigger deal about it. I don't know why I didn't start a new thread about it?!?! WE WENT TO NASHVILLE AND SAW ERIC CLAPTON IN CONCERT! One week ago today. What can I say about it beyond it was one of the greatest musical experiences in my life? My wife and I discussed it at length before clicking on "Purchase" on the Ticketmaster site. It was a significant investment, not just in terms of ticket cost, but it would be a two day drive each way and, if going that far, we decided to make a week long vacation out of it. But we reasoned that Eric may not be touring that much longer. We may not get this opportunity again. Immediately after the last song he played, before leaving the arena, we agreed we were so glad we made the decision we did! What an experience. The concert was an experience but so was the entire trip. We saw the Country Music Hall of Fame, The Ryman, most of the expected tourist sites. But what fun downtown Nashville is. Walk into a bar or restaurant and a band is playing. And the band is great! Walk a couple doors down the street and another great band is playing. Every few doors the same experience and all no cover charge. And not just country bands. Lots of cover bands. And here is what is almost depressing. Every guitar player is amazingly talented. Every one. And...........while in Nashville, I worked in a face-to-face lesson with Steve. And it was, predictably, hugely helpful, encouraging and educational. Thanks @Steve Krenz! Now I have to work on those 3 notes on a string scales! And the 7th chords! Oh, and I did mention the guitar stores, didn't I? Well I did hit Gruhn's and Carter's Vintage and Rumble Seat! And, yes, there will be a NGD post coming in the next day of two. I just have to get a photo. It's probably not going to be what most of you expect.
    7 points
  18. This has been a fun summer for my band. It began with an invitation last October to bring the group to my high school class of ‘ 69’s 70th birthday party and morphed into 6 other outdoor gigs throughout the summer months. We played the birthday party gig a week ago and finish up playing at a street party charity event this weekend. Our 4th of July gig for a closed neighborhood was particularly special. No fireworks this year because of the NW drought conditions, so the fireworks money went to the band…$1200. Hope others here had a chance to get out also and play or watch some music this year . This pic of the party, a great venue, is at The Summit Lodge in SW Washington. Me in blue. Our first encore! Greg
    7 points
  19. I was, as many of you recall, trying to decide between the Martin 000-EC and the less expensive Martin 000-15M. Actually, as you also may recall I ended up going with the Martin M-36, which I am enjoying immensely. But I had that nagging, "what if?" . By going with the M-36 I saved significantly from what I would have spent on the Clapton. What else could a guy do? What is the only logical thing to do with those savings?!?!?!? 😉😆 Today, I picked up the little 000 Martin Mahogany. I have only played it a little since getting it home. But with it forecast to hit 104 today I am going to be spending this afternoon in the house. But thus far I can tell you it is an entirely different sound than the M-36. A lot fuller, robust lows probably due to the mahogany. And so playable and the 000 size is really comfortable to me. It is going to be another great, acoustic blues instrument, like the M-36, but, again, different. I'm thinking, In the very near future, of starting to try some acoustic slide. So I suspect one of these will be dedicated to that and probably tuned to a different tuning. After some time with them I'll decide which. And, again, forgive the horrible photo. I'm getting it out of its case!
    7 points
  20. This is my rendition of "Lewis & Clark," my favorite Tommy Emmanuel song. It's got elements from both the original recording from 2006 and the updated version from last year, plus a few of my own ideas. There are a few instances in the recording that sound like clipping or static of some kind, but I can't get rid of it. I had the levels low enough where clipping shouldn't have been an issue, and it wasn't apparent on the waveform, so I'm not sure what the problem is. I experimented with different settings, and also recorded some tests with mics instead of plugging in, and it was still there to different degrees. Maybe I have a problem with my interface. At any rate, thanks for listening.
    7 points
  21. New Gear Day arrived this past Sunday. I pulled the trigger on a new Martin Road Series cutaway dreadnaught. Sounds great! Happy New Year’s to everyone.
    7 points
  22. Hi Folks; I haven't posted a song for a while so I thought it's time... Here's my rendition of a classic "Blue Moon". (Gibson ES335, Focusrite 2i2 interface direct to Reaper DAW) I hope you enjoy listening. All the Best! Neil "Blue Moon" is a classic popular song written by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart in 1934. It may be the first instance of the familiar "50s progression" in a popular song and has become a standard ballad. The song was a hit twice in 1949 with successful recordings in the U.S. by Billy Eckstine and Mel Tormé. In 1961, "Blue Moon" became an international number-one hit for the doo-*** group The Marcels, on the Billboard 100 chart and in the UK Singles chart. Over the years, "Blue Moon" has been covered by various artists, including versions by Frank Sinatra, Billie Holiday, Elvis Presley, Sam Cooke, The Platters, The Mavericks, Dean Martin, Yvonne De Carlo, The Supremes, Cyndi Lauper, Bob Dylan and Rod Stewart. Bing Crosby included the song in a medley on his album On the Happy Side (1962). The Cowboy Junkies recorded the song on their album The Trinity Sessions. It is also the anthem[1] of English Football League club Crewe Alexandra and English Premier League football club Manchester City, who have both adapted the song slightly. Credit; Wikipaedia
    7 points
  23. You probably saw my post about our trip to Nashville and visiting the requisite guitar shops: Gruhn's, Carter's, Rumble Seat. The day after going to the Eric Clapton concert we visited the first two of those. And before visiting those I had given some thought to what I am missing in my guitar "stable". I had been giving some thought to this even before the drive down. And it became obvious what I am missing is the Tele "snap". I, of course, being a blues guy, or wanting to be, never saw me with a Tele. But then I thought about Robben Ford, Keith Richards, The boss Bruce Springstein, and others. And most influential among those was Robben Ford. Here is the blues guy playing a Tele. So with the decision made, or almost firmly decided, it was off to the stores the day after the Clapton concert. And certainly we had to hit Gruhn's first. They had about five Teles including a Vintera, a couple 75th Anniversary one, a Signature (I can't remember who) and a Professional. I didn't like the Vintera at all. I'm opposed to relicing. The Signature was way too heavy. And the was something distasteful about the Anniversary ones. They just didn't connect. But the Professional did. Gorgeous natural wood finish, not painted. And it played really nice. I didn't plug it in and told the salesman we would think on it. Which was code for we still had to check out the other stores. Which we did. We went to Carter's. And I was shocked. I'm not sure if before composing his Guitar Stores List @Dave White felt this way, but I found Carter's inventory to be way bigger than Gruhn. But nothing in the Teles called out. So the next day we went back to Gruhn's and I played the Professional plugged in. And it WAS awesome. I loved it. And kids! Here is the life lesson. I told the guy I wanted to think on it one more day. We were leaving town the next day and would stop back to play it one more time on the way out. And now you know where this is going🤔 On the way to Gruhn's my wife pointed out a shop and said, "There's a guitar store! Called Rumble Seat. why haven't we gone there?" So finally, we are packed and heading out of town and I am just going to swing by Gruhn's and pick up my new Tele. Which we did. At least stop by. And the Tele is gone! So we headed back to the parking lot with the intent of pointing the car west. And I said, "Ok. Just while we are here, so I can say I've been there, let's just pop in Rumble Seat". And we did. And they had a shocking inventory on the wall. A Strat played by Ronnie Wood and a Tele played by Keith Richards just for two examples. And about 10 Teles. And here is the one that spoke to me! It's a 2018 and it played great. And sounded great. And so Bryan @Plantsman13, it is going to be a very long time before another NGD post from me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Since being home now better than a week I've played almost nothing else:
    6 points
  24. I mentioned above we are moving and the new home has a music room/studio/man cave that is huge. This is it! This was shot before the move and I would be too embarrassed to show it to you now. But it is mine!!!! All mine!!!!! 😉🙃 It is a shambles with boxes everywhere. But I hope that I can show you an organized practice room in the near future. @DianeB is helping me with that by PM. Thanks Diane! Practice has been almost non-existent the last couple months. But, hopefully, in the very near future I will have no excuse. And, I took a Zoom lesson with @Steve Krenz recently (before starting the move). Predictably, it was hugely helpful and educational. Of course it was! And I purchased 4 more lessons. So with the great practice space and lessons with Steve I am going to have no excuse to not progress and finish up L&MG!!!!! Finally.
    6 points
  25. For Gibson fans seeking a religious experience, the answer to your prayers awaits at Cummins Station in Nashville, a short walk from Music City Center:
    6 points
  26. Here's a clear explanation of augmented chords and how they function. It's not guitar-oriented, so if these are new to you, start with F+ at xxx221 (xx3221 for the purists) and go up the fretboard.
    6 points
  27. This is my submission for the May Recording Challenge, a cover version of the Beatles hit, "Yesterday". It was my first try at using a DAW with Reaper. (yes, I have finally fell into the rabbit hole of the DAW crowd) The recording was made using an Eastman T486 into a Boss ME-80, then direct into a Focusrite 2i2 Scarlett. For a backing track I used an instrumental version by The String Quartet on You Tube. Henk
    6 points
  28. Version 1.0.1

    4,297 downloads

    This is the PDF for Travis Picking Bootcamp Workout Pages 1-10 and a Basic and Intermediate Versions of "Freight Train" Freight Train (Basic Solo).pdf Freight Train (Intermediate Solo).pdf Travis Picking Bootcamp pgs1-10.pdf
    6 points
  29. For this month DougH and I decided to do a compilation song together 🙂 Doug chose the song from Hal Leonard's Easy Pop Melodies. He played the Rhythm and Bass section, and I played the Lead Melody. We hope you enjoy listening! "Can You Feel the Love Tonight" is a song from Disney's 1994 animated film The Lion King[1] composed by Elton John with lyrics by Tim Rice.[2] It was described by Don Hahn (the film's producer), Roger Allers and Rob Minkoff (the film's directors) as having "the most diverse history" in the film.[3] It was a chart hit in the UK, peaking at number 14 on the UK Singles Chart,[2] and achieved even more success in the US, reaching number four on the Billboard Hot 100. The song was a number-one hit in Canada and France. At the 67th Academy Awards in March 1995 it won the Academy Award for Best Original Song. The same year the song also won Elton John the Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance. (Wikipaedia) Produced for personal use and not for profit. For those interested in the technical details; Lead guitar; Godin 5th Ave Archtop p90. Rhythm guitar; Simon & Patrick Acoustic. Bass Guitar; Dean electric. Recorded direct to computer interface and mixed into Reaper DAW.
    6 points
  30. I have deleted yesterday’s (2/3/21) spam post. I left it up for a day to increase awareness. In the interest of transparency, I'd like all to know that I informed the member that the forum was not for solicitation, and because they made no introduction or demonstration of interest in the forum, I issued a warning. If it reoccurs, they will be suspended or banned. There's nothing inherently wrong with self-promotion on the internet, but here, happily, we have boundaries. If you see something suspicious, please advise one of the moderators.
    6 points
  31. Hello everyone, this months Recording Challenge comes from Neil ES335 it is Hope, Peace, & Love Neil said "I propose songs in the theme "Hope, Peace, & Love"... something the world desperately needs, especially right now." I am sorry that I am late putting this up, Neil replied to my message the same day but I didn't get an email notification, luckily I remembered and checked the forum today. 1. WimVD1 playing “Windy and Warm” 2, @rockinrickard playing "Grandpa" 3. @NeilES335 "What The World Needs Now"
    6 points
  32. Santa came early and delivered this beautiful Taylor E14ce. This is a limited model, originally only available to dealers at Taylor’s Roadshows. The back and sides are West African Ebony, and the top is Sitka Spruce. It's very balanced with great sustain and clarity, and very responsive. The highs just ring, with a pure, fat tone, especially when you dig in. If I had to describe it in one word, I’d say “powerful.” I play acoustic almost exclusively fingerstyle, with bare fingers, and this guitar can get incredibly loud. It really shines when played hard. Love this guitar.
    6 points
  33. @3rdwaverider @Nutty 1 and others who gave me a Like; thank you so much for your kind comments. @3rdwaverider I especially appreciate the feedback. These points are just what I've been working on... clear articulation of each note, allowing the right notes to ring out, others muted as appropriate. I should also mention, credit for this arrangement goes to the great contemporary jazz guitarist, Frank Vignola, Truefire Jazz Studio. ps.@3rdWaverider I did post a Beatles song previously; "Till there Was You"
    6 points
  34. well I tried to get this done for the June Challenge. but didn't work out. You have two choices.. you can listen to the no vocal version or add lots of ear protection and listen to the vocal version. This is out of Steve's Song Hits.. Session 5 if you will.. there wasn't much in the way of rhythm track to the song, so I ran the melody mostly on the neck pickup of a Epiphone Sheraton semi-hollow, the solo (I must come up with a more inventive solo idea) was switch to the bridge pickup and yes.. is "just" the melody played in the 12th position. it was a mix of mic'ing the speaker and since I run a very loud 30w tube amp, I have an attenuator on it that has line out .. so the lead is a mix of the two types of inputs.. speaker and speaker emulation. the rhythm track was done on my acoustic straight in to the mixer. last was my Dean Edge 4 bass to give a little more bottom end.. (if your ears are bleeding.. don't sue me.. you were warned about ear protection)
    5 points
  35. I’ve been looking at all koa guitars for about 15 years, but never pulled the trigger on one until now. I don’t normally buy acoustic guitars without a test drive, but I took a chance on this one, and I’m glad I did. It sounds amazing, plays like a dream, and has without a doubt the most beautiful koa top I’ve ever seen. Happy and blessed. (I can't take photos nearly as good as Sweetwater does, so these are all from their listing except for the last one.)
    5 points
  36. Here's a song I love that I first heard played by one of my guitar hero's Wes Montgomery. I hope you enjoy listening! "Here's That Rainy Day" is a popular song with music by Jimmy Van Heusen and lyrics by Johnny Burke that was published in 1953. It was introduced by Dolores Gray in the Broadway musical Carnival in Flanders.[1] Frank Sinatra recorded the song on March 25, 1959, for the Capitol album No One Cares, arranged and conducted by Gordon Jenkins. Sinatra performed it on a Timex-sponsored show entitled The Frank Sinatra Timex Show: An Afternoon with Frank Sinatra broadcast on December 13, 1959, and on the Emmy-nominated Francis Albert Sinatra Does His Thing, broadcast on November 25, 1968. On November 18, 1973, he performed it on his television comeback special, Magnavox Presents Frank Sinatra, in a medley with "Last Night When We Were Young" and "Violets for Your Furs".[2][3] Sinatra also performed the song during three concerts in 1974 at Caesar's Palace in Philadelphia and Saratoga, New York.[4] Late-night talk show host Johnny Carson said "Here's That Rainy Day" by Frank Sinatra was his favorite ballad. Carson and Bette Midler sang the song on the penultimate episode of The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson on May 21, 1992. Singer/songwriter Paul Williams sang the song on the show in ape makeup as part of promotion for his film Battle for the Planet of the Apes. After Carson's death in 2005, Doc Severinsen, Tommy Newsom, and Ed Shaughnessy performed the song with Paul Shaffer and the CBS Orchestra on Late Show with David Letterman.[5] It has also become a jazz standard with recordings by, among others, Bill Evans, Duke Jordan, Wes Montgomery, and McCoy Tyner. (Courtesy Wikipedia) Rhythm and Melody Tracks by NeilES335. Bass/Drum track courtesy of Frank Vignola. Not for profit; fair use. Recorded direct to Reaper DAW, Godin 5th Ave Kingpin Archtop.
    5 points
  37. For my theme of ' Hope, Peace, & Love ' this month ... "What the World Needs Now Is Love" is a 1965 popular song with lyrics by Hal David and music composed by Burt Bacharach. First recorded and made popular by Jackie DeShannon, it was released on April 15, 1965, on the Imperial label after a release on sister label Liberty records the previous month was canceled. It peaked at number seven on the US Hot 100 in July of that year.[1] In Canada, the song reached number one. (Wikipedia) My cover of this very popular song, that I think is just as appropriate today as it was in 1965. I hope you enjoy it! All the Best! Neil ps the back story for the song makes interesting reading; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/What_the_World_Needs_Now_Is_Love
    5 points
  38. Some would say, "What? Neil playing a pop song. Not Jazz? " Weil, yes. This one was a request from my dear wife, who is a big Bee Gee's fan. " How Can You Mend A Broken Heart" was the Gibb's first BIG hit in North America. It is the longest song I've recorded to date; over 3 minutes of continuous playing. I played both the rhythm and melody. The Bee Gees rarely performed the song the same way twice! This one is as close to a live performance as I could get, including what seems to be an extra bar on the last chorus. I used my ES335 direct to Reaper DAW, with very little effects added ( a touch of reverb, that's about it). I hope you enjoy it : - )) All the Best! Neil
    5 points
  39. not a polished or smooth as some of the members here recordings.. and I lost a full week of practicing (if like that would have helped) from recovering my computer from a major corrupted crash
    5 points
  40. I realise this isn't the Beatles... but it is a Christmas Song. My little contribution to the Christmas season; a recording of "Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas". I hope you enjoy it, and it spreads a little joy to you and yours. I'm Dedicating this recording to my Dear Mother, who went to be with the Lord, 4years ago this week. Mom loved Christmas so much and made it very special for all of us. God Bless; Neil (see MP3 attached file below) Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas-003.mp3
    5 points
  41. Here's my arrangement of "O Come All Ye Faithful," warts and all.
    5 points
  42. This months Recording Challenge comes from me, the topic is Movies/Tv/Theatre. Any song or tune that has been used in a film or a theatre production or a television program. As usual the "winner":will be picked at random and the prize is that they get to choose the topic for the next challenge. 1. Wim VD1 playing “Tears in Heaven” 2. 3rdwaverider playing “Here’s that Rainy Day”
    5 points
  43. Your typical iphone video of a couple of songs at a street party for the 4th of July. Other clips on Facebook , The Ottomatics group, for different summer outdoor gigs. Greg
    4 points
  44. Here's my latest Jazz Studio collaboration; "That's All". This time featuring two fine Canadian jazz guitarists, JP Cousineau (Montreal Quebec), Dan Kozar (Windsor, Ontario) and myself. What a treat to play with these gentlemen. We hope you enjoy listening!
    4 points
  45. Hey everyone, I did a cover of "All I have to do is dream" for this month (session four of the Song Hits). Had a lot of fun doing this song. It was my first time doing a backing track and using a DAW. Hope you enjoy.
    4 points
  46. Believe it or not, the "Random Picker" picked me as the winner of the last monthly challenge, so here is this month's topic: "Play us any song that was written in the previous century." Now this is a very open topic, with a gazillion songs to choose from. Please remember, it's not about being the best. It's all about recording, sharing and giving us something to listen to. 1. @Wim VD1 playing "Fortunate Son". 2. @NeilES335 and @Eracer_Team-DougH playing "Can You Feel The Love Tonight". 3. @Mike Hoodenpyle playing "Classical Gas". Wim.
    4 points
  47. And Here's the YouTube Video where I play the opening bars of 'If I Had You", with 12 other players from 6 countries! (that's me at the beginning with the blue/white stripe shirt 🙂
    4 points
  48. I want to thank Mandy as well for running the challenge for all those months, for giving all the renditions a listen and for writing to all participants some lines with kind and supportive feedback 👍👍👍 Today, I was scrolling trough some old challenge threads and retrieved an old video post from Uncle Hammy from the Learn and Master Guitar Gathering 2016 Student Showcase. Uncle Hammy administered the monthly challenge in the years before Mandy took over, and in this video he is introduced by Steve and explains how the challenge works. Five years later, the rules and principles are still the same. So let me roll the dice (or rather use the app random-picker), pick the winner of the month and invite you all to participate to the next challenge. Wim.
    4 points

About us

Guitar Gathering is a community of guitar lovers of all types and skill levels.  This is a place of learning, support and encouragement.  We are unapologetically positive.

If you've come here to gripe, demean others or talk politics then this isn't the place for you.

But if you've come to talk guitars, ask questions and learn from professionals and guitar learners from all over the world then come on in!

Get in touch

Follow us

facebook feed

Recent tweets

×
×
  • Create New...