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WHAT'S GOING ON THIS MONTH
  • This Month's Live Streaming Guitar Lessons: TUESDAY AUGUST 6TH - USING CHORD TONES AS SEEDS FOR SOLOING. Improvising can be intimidating - but here's a simple trick you can use to spark soloing ideas. By using the chord tones, you can create simple "seed" ideas that can be expandaded into much larger musical ideas. TUESDAY AUGUST 20TH - BEING A SINGER/SONGWRITER WITH ROB HARRIS. Ever dreamed of playing your own songs at a songwriters night? or perhaps playing guitar at a local restaurant? Rob Harris is a master of this and he will be dropping by to talk about crafting your own songs and building gigs. SPECIAL EVENT: MONDAY AUGUST 26TH - THE BOUTIQUE GUITAR SHOWCASE. These are some of the rarest and fascinating instruments in the world. We'll be showing these amazing instruments live from Gruhn Guitars in Nashville Tennessee. Watch LIVE on our Guitar Gathering YouTube Channel. It's going to be a great month! Learn all you can!

Wim VD

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Wim VD last won the day on August 5 2018

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About Wim VD

  • Birthday 06/22/1968

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    Belgium

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  1. For some unknown reason I cannot reply to the existing thread on the Forum started by @UncleHammy, but creating a new topic is still working. So here is my entry for this month. I took the chords from AC/DC's Ride On and added some improvisation. Thanks for listening, Wim
  2. @NeilES335, Hi Neil, The Session 14 Bonus Materials contain an intro to arpeggios. The exercise is a harmonized major scale in C, played as 7th arpeggios. The harmonized major scale is further explained in Session 15. The course however does not contain any further coverage of arpeggios. It was only in Session 19 (soloing), that I became really aware of the importance of arpeggios. In this Session, Steve explains the concept of Chord Tone Soloing (when playing a solo over a chord progression, the chord tones of the underlying chord are the safe notes to land on in your solo). To put Chord Tone Soloing into practice, the only way I find working for me is to learn chord arpeggios and to build the muscle memory. Now this is a big task. Following the CAGED system, this means learning 5 moveable patterns for major and 5 for minor triads, and extend that to also cover 7th chords (major, minor, (half-) diminished etc.).  The resource I used for this is Chord Tone Soloing from Barrett Tagliarino. I have included arpeggios in my daily practice routine for about 6 monts now, and it is worth the effort. To be able to instantly make the connection between the chord, the chord tones (and the related scale or mode) is a very important skill and is a breakthrough in my development as a guitar player. As you know I started the L&M Blues course last week. Where Sessions 2 and 3 of that course are hard to many students, it is the knowledge of 7th chord arpeggios that helps me through these sessions without real issues. So I can only recommend to put the effort into learning arpeggios in depth, because you will benefit from it in your guitar learning journey later. Wim.
  3. Eric Johnson's Cliffs of Dover is in my top 3 of coolest Strat solo's. Wim.
  4. @Eracer_Team-DougH and @NeilES335, I guess I will be on this blues journey alone then. As long as the old forum is still on line, I can get some Blues Session related info there if needed. just finished Session 1 and starting 2 today. Things will get a bit slower from now on, but it's big fun. Wim.
  5. I just started the L&M Blues Guitar course today and was wondering who else is currently working on this. Wim.
  6. That 's great, Greg. I guess you are the guy in the middle, right? Wim.
  7. Looking for a song that would fit into this month's challenge, I came across this one from Passenger. I don't play fingerstyle often, and learning the intro took much more effort and time than expected. But now it's done, I definitely want to keep it in the small repertoire I started to build. Thanks for listening. Wim.
  8. Happy birthday, Steve!

  9. That's great, Ian. Well done. Wim.
  10. Thanks, Neil. You are now moving into the last couple of sessions of the course yourself and that is where things get really interesting. Keep going, you're almost there. Wim.
  11. Mick, envision yourself in a nearby future as guitarplayer playing the songs you love together with Jules and friends. It's this kind of vision that get's people started and motivated on this journey. Enjoy L&M and don't forget to learn some songs on the way. Wim.
  12. When working on a new piece of music or an exercise, I use 3 information sources. The 2 main ones for me are the audio file and the tab. I do know all the notes on the fingerboard, but still the most efficient way for me to learn a melody is to look at the tab. The tab tells me where to play a note, whereas the sheet music leaves this open. I only use the sheet music, as third source, to identify the key and for the info on rythm and lenght of notes and breaks. Please don't get me wrong here. I do think it is important for me to understand and know what notes I am playing and how they relate to the key and to the chords they are played over. But I rather derive this from the position of my fingers on the fredboard than from the sheet music. Now this is what works for me, but there is a big disadvantage. I am not able to read sheet music or tab at playing speed. So basically, I have to analyse and study a piece of music and then completely memorize it. Unlike myself, my 13 year old daughter who is learning to play violin, has gone through 4 years of studying music theory as part of her classical music education. She does not have to fully memorize the music she is playing, because she has learned to read and play notes simultanuously at the required tempo. That's a nice pay off. Now tab would not work for violin anyhow ? Wim.
  13. I am sorry to read this, Randy and I hope you recover soon. Wim
  14. Thanks, Steve. The strange thing is that this feels more like a start than an end to me now. It's like having earned an entry ticket into the world of making music. On the journey, I learned a lot about the learning process as well. A piece of music might seem tricky and difficult to learn at the start, but by breaking it down into smaller pieces, by taking it really slow, and putting in the necessary time, it can be done. Building this confidence is to me an essential part of a musician's development. Thanks again for all that you do for us. Wim.

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