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RCL

note tie ?

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Hi All,  How do you play two different notes not of the same pitch ( say an E and D )  with a tie between them?  I understand how if there the same note.    I`m on session 11 but I must have missed this along the way.  Thanks

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RCL, show us a picture of what you mean.  The only tie I see online  is between 2 notes of the same pitch.  If they are different pitches I think that is called a "slur".  I'm sure if Diane is around she will know.  Every time Steve listed something in the course I would look it up online to get more input on that subject.  (Sometimes I just "didn't get it" and it helped to read about it from other sources.) GH

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Posted (edited)

Depending on the context 

Hammer on, pull off or a slide

Also Steve in session 10 finger style..  would have "stacked notes" in the music, chord block above , but specified a certain finger pick that might not necessarily make notes or chord block 

Specified TAB will over ride music and chord blocks

This a specific lesson in S11, or just music you ran into 

Edited by Eracer_Team-DougH

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This is part of the melody to (Anytime At All by The Beatles) I am learning. Thanks guys for your replys59884658_Image(2).jpg.c32e2463e1342e67ccf0170ae5e2e744.jpg

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A tie like that indicates that the second note (here, probably for the vocalist) is not to be attacked, simply that its duration is added to that of the first note. Instrumentally, it's the same as a slur, meaning the two notes are to be played legato.

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I would assume that you're working on the single note melody.

since its a E to a D.. and you're probably in the open position.. just do a light pull off from the E and let the Open D ring

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Thanks Shadow Boxer88, Eracer-Team-DougH and Diane B for your help. Its just a simple melody of a song to some but its Music to my ears, I`ve learned enough so far with this course to enjoy my guitar but theres so much more to learn

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1 hour ago, RCL said:

Thanks Shadow Boxer88, Eracer-Team-DougH and Diane B for your help. Its just a simple melody of a song to some but its Music to my ears, I`ve learned enough so far with this course to enjoy my guitar but theres so much more to learn

You're so right... The more I learn the more there is to learn.

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I would read that particular notation as a pull off. Usually a slide will have a straight line between the notes. If you listen to the recording closely you should be able to hear if it's a slide or pull off.

You can always try it both ways and pick the one you like best.

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Thanks tjmeyers, I gave it a try and it sounds good as a pull off. I hope reading your replies have helped others as much as its helped me.

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Yes, I would read that as a pull-off in guitar notation.

Here's the scoop...

1) Curved line (Tie) between two notes of the same pitch = A TIE that functions as a rhythmic extension of the first note to make the first note longer in duration.  You'll see these on notes within the same measure and also to hold a note over the barline.

2) Curved line (Tie) between two notes of different pitches = A SLUR indicator for a wind instrument.

If you were playing a clarinet then you wouldn't re-articulate the second note.  

BUT, guitar players are not wind instruments, so if we see this between two notes in a guitar piece it would indicate to use either a Hammer-On (if the second note is higher in pitch than the first note) or a Pull-Off (if the second note is lower in pitch than the first note.)

Hope this helps.

Learn all you can! - Steve

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9 minutes ago, Steve Krenz said:

Yes, I would read that as a pull-off in guitar notation.

Here's the scoop...

1) Curved line (Tie) between two notes of the same pitch = A TIE that functions as a rhythmic extension of the first note to make the first note longer in duration.  You'll see these on notes within the same measure and also to hold a note over the barline.

2) Curved line (Tie) between two notes of different pitches = A SLUR indicator for a wind instrument.

If you were playing a clarinet then you wouldn't re-articulate the second note.  

BUT, guitar players are not wind instruments, so if we see this between two notes in a guitar piece it would indicate to use either a Hammer-On (if the second note is higher in pitch than the first note) or a Pull-Off (if the second note is lower in pitch than the first note.)

Hope this helps.

Learn all you can! - Steve

Hey Steve, could it indicate that you slide from one note to the other as well?

Wim.

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Yes, I forgot to mention that one.  Yes, it would sometimes indicate a slide as well.

In strict guitar notation (in other words, if the sheet music was written for guitar) a "slide" would be indicated with a straight line between two notes as opposed to a curved line.

But, much of the time, you will be reading music that is written for other instruments. In that case, it wouldn't be uncommon to interpret a curved line as a slide.

So, the question becomes as the player, "What do I play? a Pull-Off, Hammer-On or Slide".  The answer is is that it is up to you as the performer to play whatever you prefer.

If the composer had a preference then he should have taken the time to write in specifically what he wanted - otherwise it's the performer's choice.

- Steve

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Thanks Steve !

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