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V7#5b9

Free Jazz Chords Supplemental Resource

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For those interested in adding more chords and learning how to build them on the fretboard, there is a website where you can download and compile PDF files of Ted Greene’s revolutionary V-System for free. Steve has mentioned Ted’s Chord Chemistry book a few times. I don’t have the book, but as I recall Steve had said it was mostly page after page of chord diagrams. This on the other hand is a system that can be used to construct chords on the fretboard. Here’s the link to Ted Greene’s V-System.

I hope you will find the methods helpful. 

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Thanks Gerard. I will check it out.

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Thanks for the info Gerard.

 

Jim

 

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Great Gerard.....thank you? Found some easy chord melody arrangements right away to use my Fretboard Workout chord knowledge on.

o

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Thanks for the information.  I'll give it a try!

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Question regarding the 6th string root chords:  Steve states the 5th string is never played but I've learned the Gm7 barre chord utilizes the fifth string D.  In fact, Steve mentions you can rest the ring finger in his video.  Why is it being omitted in a jazz context?

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2 hours ago, Plantsman13 said:

Question regarding the 6th string root chords:  Steve states the 5th string is never played but I've learned the Gm7 barre chord utilizes the fifth string D.  In fact, Steve mentions you can rest the ring finger in his video.  Why is it being omitted in a jazz context?

The short answer is because in the context of jazz full Barre chords contain too many redundant notes. 

But, that may not be enough, so let me elaborate a bit. Jazz chords are derived from four part structures or the 7th chords that are played on various string sets. Those 7th chords are then modified to add colour. The 3rd and 7th are the primary guide tones that define the chord’s quality, e.g. minor or major so you don’t omit or change them. The root and the 5th are expendable and are used to turn them into extensions, alterations or a combination of both. From there you can add another tone or double an existing one. In the jazz context the 7th chords are really only a means to an end, and you want to play them with extensions and alterations. 

When you play solo as in chord melody arrangement, you may want to use fuller chords, but when you play with an ensemble or a backing track, you need to use leaner chords to leave room for the bass and even keyboard. 

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Gerald,

Thanks for taking the time to elaborate.   It is appreciated.  I'm definitely new to the jazz way of approaching  music (in other words, I'm facing a very steep learning curve).

Bryan

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Love watching the videos of Ted Greene, especially the one where he is playing at someone's wedding.  Those around him seem oblivious to what he is doing.  Good person as well as a great musician and teacher.

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Comping seems a fitting topic for this thread so I thought I’d put it here. Despite promotional aspect and informality of Richie’s videos, they cover important concepts with a fair bit of depth and you can get a lot out of them. Below the video and for your convenience, I provided a little transcript of the chord types Richie talks about and what you can do with them. Richie promises a follow-up vid as well. 

Major 7 Chords (1-3-5-7)

When a major 7 is over the I of the key you can add the 9 or the 13. When it’s over the IV, it’s a Lydian chord which allows for all it’s upper extensions… 9, #11 and 13. You get to choose.

Dominant 7 Chords (1-3-5-b7)

This is going to vary widely as far as the extensions go. Usually, although not always, if it resolves a perfect 5th down to a major chord it can use the 9 or the 13. However, if it resolves a perfect 5th down to a minor chord, it will use a b9 or #9 and if you like a #11. A b13 can also replace the 5th. This becomes what is known as an Altered Dominant.

Minor 7 Chords (1-b3-5-b7)

Almost all minor chords can use a 9th and the 11th, however avoid the 9th if it is a III minor chord.

Minor 7b5 Chords (1-b3-b5-b7) also known as Half-diminished chord.

For most instances you are safe using the 11th and the b13. Use the 9th only when the I is a Imin6 or Imin-maj7 chord.

Diminished 7 Chords (1-b3-b5-bb7)

Augmented 7 Chords (1-3-#5-b7) This chord sometimes implies the more complex altered chord. The altered chord can also be viewed as an alternative for an augmented dominant 7th because it has all the same basic tones only that the upper extensions are all altered, that is if you use a 9th it should be a b9 or #9, if you use an 11th it should be a #11. The b13 of course is a #5 which should already be a part of the fundamental 7th chord.

Altered Dominant 7th Chords (1-3-b7 / b9, #9, #11, b13)

Another instance that usually implies the use of the altered dominant is when you see a 7b9 or 7#9 chord.

Dominant 7 Suspended 4 Chords (1-4-5-b7)

Here you can safely add the 9th and 13th.

Slash Chords (D/C = D triad with a C in the bass) are a way of sometimes simplifying the spelling of an inversion wanted for a chord with specific extensions. Usually, the first portion is an upper extension triad. D/C is made up of:

A = 13

F# = #11

D = 9

C = 1

In relation to the C, D is the 9th, F# is the #11, and A is the 13. So, if you know your harmony, you will recognize it as a Lydian or Lydian b7 chord.

Another common example would be:  F/G

C = sus4

A = 9

F = b7

G = 1

In relation to the G bass note the F is the dominant 7th, the A is the 9th, and the C is the sus4 or the 11th depending on the context.

Edited by V7#5b9
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So, here’s the second video with some “Butter Notes” for comping. 

 

Edited by V7#5b9
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