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Nutty 1

Guitar players who play in duets have a higher intuition.

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Posted (edited)

Guitar players who play in duets have a higher intuition.

This is the scientific paper that the article was based on. Not particularly well written.🙂

Intra- and interbrain synchronization and network properties when playing guitar in duets

One for @DianeB when the Guitar Gathering conference is over 🤔 and any other scientists here?

I wonder if that would also hold true for people who have never played to live music but to backing tracks.

What is a "non-overlapping duet"?

 

Edited by Nutty 1

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3 hours ago, Nutty 1 said:

One for @DianeB when the Guitar Gathering conference is over 🤔 and any other scientists here?

I wonder if that would also hold true for people who have never played to live music but to backing tracks.

What is a "non-overlapping duet"?

 

I guess I qualify for one of the resident nerds here.🙄😏   (Microbiologist)

I wondered about the "non-overlapping duet" myself.  I think that it may be the fact that " In contrast to the work of Lindenberger et al. (2009), in which pairs of guitarists were playing in unison, guitarists in the present study were playing in two voices, thereby reducing similarities in movement, proprioception, and perception "  The subjects were not playing the same music.  They were playing a duet but two different parts; different melodies.  They called it "two voices".

Mandy, an interesting question to see if there is a similar response playing to backing tracks.  And what if playing blues instead of classical? 😉

 

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Thank you @matonanjin so they are playing different parts at the same time 💡.

Good point about blues versus classical.

What about improvising and jamming?

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